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3 Types of Therapy For Chronic Pain That Can Improve Your Health and Quality of Life

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3 Types of Therapy For Chronic Pain That Can Improve Your Health and Quality of Life

Chronic pain can be incredibly frustrating and debilitating. It may prevent you from getting adequate rest each night, eating nutritiously, or exercising regularly; furthermore, it may leave you feeling helpless and isolated.

Therapy can be an effective tool in managing chronic pain. It helps you avoid and/or reduce thought processes that make the situation worse, like feeling like you’ll die from it (pain catastrophizing) or worrying that the discomfort will get worse.

Here are three effective therapies for chronic pain that have been scientifically proven to improve health and quality of life: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) helps you alter your thinking to reduce the negative impact of pain on you. It may also help manage symptoms, reduce anxiety and depression, as well as boost resilience in the face of adversity.

Psychological flexibility therapies such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), encourage mindfulness and acceptance of thoughts, feelings and experiences. They instruct patients to stop trying to control or eliminate their pain and instead focus on learning how to live with it.

Progressive Relaxation Training, or PRT for short, is a type of therapy for chronic pain that uses specialized training to teach you how to teach your brain to switch off the pain sensation. It’s particularly useful for people who struggle with catastrophizing or fear of their discomfort getting worse.

Many people with chronic pain have endured trauma before their illness or injury. Studies have demonstrated that these early traumas can alter how your brain perceives pain signals.

If you’ve experienced an especially painful trauma, talking with your therapist about it may be beneficial. They can help heal the pain center of your brain so that future episodes are less likely to cause similar discomfort.

Attending a support group for people living with chronic pain can be beneficial, as you’ll have the chance to connect with others facing similar struggles. These groups give you the motivation and inspiration to keep going during difficult times, with the hope that one day you’ll be pain-free.

Medications can be an integral part of treating chronic pain. Your therapist can assist you in finding nonaddictive remedies such as acetaminophen or anti-inflammatory drugs that won’t lead to addiction.

Chronic pain patients often find relief through a combination of medications, therapy and lifestyle changes. You may need to have your medication tested regularly so your therapist can gauge how well it’s working for you.

Other ways to manage your pain include avoiding activities or behaviors that cause it, like placing weight on an area prone to discomfort or taking too much medication as prescribed. You could also try breathing techniques and the relaxation technique known as meditation for further relief.

Chronic pain treatment requires a combination of approaches that will vary from person to person. The key is finding a therapist who can work together with you on understanding your individual needs and the underlying causes of your discomfort.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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