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Adjunct Therapy For Social Anxiety

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Adjunct Therapy For Social Anxiety

Adjunct therapy refers to any treatment that supplements or enhances psychotherapy or medications. Some adjunct therapies for social anxiety include Applied Relaxation Training, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Mindfulness- and Acceptance-Based Therapies, as well as Transdiagnostic Group Therapy.

Applied relaxation involves learning techniques that help to unwind both body and mind, such as meditation or visualizations. Studies have indicated that this can be an effective treatment for some individuals suffering from social anxiety.

CBT treatment consists of several components, such as psychoeducation about the disorder, exposure to fearful social situations, cognitive restructuring exercises before and after exposures, modification of core beliefs, and relapse prevention. It’s usually administered individually over 15-20 sessions.

Psychotherapy is often the most successful type of treatment for social anxiety disorder. While symptoms may take weeks to months to improve, ongoing sessions may be necessary in order to maintain progress.

Psychotherapy offers the advantage of trying different approaches to find what works best for you. You can hone coping skills that will increase your social confidence in social situations, like maintaining eye contact and asking questions about other people’s lives.

Psychotherapy and anti-anxiety medication such as benzodiazepines (ben-zoe-die AZ-uh peens) or beta blockers may also be prescribed by your healthcare provider. These drugs help reduce heart rate, blood pressure, chest pounding and shaking of voice and limbs.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be the first medication your healthcare provider might recommend if you suffer from severe social anxiety disorder. These drugs help regulate production of certain neurotransmitters such as serotonin and norepinephrine.

Other types of antidepressants are also employed to combat social anxiety. While they have similar effects as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), they typically come with fewer side effects, making them preferable alternatives for some individuals.

When considering adjunct therapy for social anxiety, the most critical thing to remember is finding the right treatment and continuing to try new treatments and lifestyle changes until symptoms improve. Furthermore, adhere to your healthcare provider’s recommendations and continue taking medication as prescribed.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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