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After Months of Talk Therapy Should I Start Doing EMDR Now Every Session?

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After Months of Talk Therapy Should I Start Doing EMDR Now Every Session?

When in therapy for something that you don’t believe to be a real problem and feeling stuck, you may start wondering if EMDR should be added into each session.

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is an evidence-based treatment that has been demonstrated to be successful in treating various forms of PTSD, anxiety, depression and other psychological issues. Before you decide whether or not to try EMDR for yourself, it’s essential to comprehend its basics: what it is and how it works.

The initial step for any EMDR treatment plan is for your therapist to conduct an initial assessment. This involves asking questions about your problems, behaviors and fears in order to determine what has triggered these sessions and if you are suitable for EMDR therapy.

Your therapist may suggest keeping a journal to record any disturbing images, emotions or bodily sensations between sessions as an aid in your EMDR progress. Doing this helps you distance yourself from unpleasant memories and thoughts so you can work towards safely reprocessing them.

If you are working with an EMDR therapist who specializes in treating complex PTSD, you can expect to see improvement in symptoms after three or more sessions. To maintain these gains throughout the process, it is important to practice self-calming techniques and learn how to manage emotional triggers between sessions.

Your therapist may ask you to focus on a particular target memory that needs changing. Your therapist uses various eye movements and techniques to desensitize you to the memories and feelings associated with that target, helping eliminate any physical or emotional reactions to trauma that still exist.

Phase two entails acknowledging your negative beliefs about yourself and replacing them with healthier, more accurate thoughts about yourself. While this can be a challenging step in the treatment plan, it is an integral component for healing.

Once you identify the positive belief about your experience, you and your therapist can move onto the next step of EMDR. This phase uses a similar approach as phase one; however, here the patient selects an image or statement to represent their distressing event.

Your therapist will then use a series of eye movements to stimulate your brain, encouraging it to reprocess the experience in new ways. This can be particularly enlightening if you have never considered it this way before.

As you and your therapist discuss the trauma, they may also offer any new insights or interpretations you have. These can be used as prompts for the next set of EMDR eye movements as you work through feelings, memories, and beliefs related to it.

Phase five involves repeating the process on another memory associated with a positive, healthy, and empowering belief. This serves to cement that belief and lay a solid foundation for further treatment in subsequent phases.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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