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Alternating Hot Cold Water Therapy

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Alternating Hot Cold Water Therapy

Alternating hot and cold water therapy, also known as contrast bathing, has been used for centuries to relieve pain and discomfort. This type of therapy, also known as contrast bathing, can be done at home and has numerous health benefits.

Research has demonstrated that when your body experiences sudden temperature changes, its blood vessels expand and more oxygen and nutrients are carried to that area, helping you heal more quickly from an injury or intense workout. According to some studies, this may also help speed up recovery time after an injury or intense workout.

However, you should avoid using ice and heat together if your injury is acute or you have certain medical conditions. For instance, do not use either ice or heat if you have heart conditions, diabetes, asthma or COPD; doing so could potentially exacerbate things.

Thermotherapy is an effective way to reduce inflammation and muscle soreness after exercise, making it suitable for those with chronic pain or short-term injuries such as rheumatoid arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, foot/ankle sprains. Studies have even demonstrated that thermotherapy was more successful than whole-body cryotherapy in post-workout recovery than previously believed – according to one study.

Physical therapists and doctors have long utilized this approach to treat various types of injuries. It’s a cost-effective, no-risk method that can speed up your recovery.

There are several methods to achieve this, but the most popular involves submerging yourself in two separate tubs of whirlpool water at varying temperatures. The hot tub should be between 95 and 113 degrees Fahrenheit while the cold bath should be around 50 to 59 degrees Fahrenheit.

According to Dr. Stanley Gallucci, a board-certified sports medicine doctor in San Diego, athletes who employ this strategy often find that it enhances their capacity for completing athletic events or training sessions. “This method can be especially helpful during intense or strenuous workouts,” says Gallucci.

Studies have demonstrated that hot and cold water therapy combined with exercise can enhance circulation, reduce muscle soreness, and accelerate recovery time after strenuous exercise sessions. This treatment can be done at home with little risk of harm and is relatively secure.

Home or in a fitness studio like Remedy Place, you can switch up the temperature of your water. Studies suggest using between 50-59 degrees Fahrenheit for optimal results; however, consult with your doctor to determine the ideal temperatures for you personally.

According to Dr. Leary, CEO and founder of Remedy Place, cold water immersion can also strengthen your blood vessels over time. He states that as the vessels around muscles in your body expand (known as vasodilation), oxygen-rich blood can better circulate to where it’s most needed.

This process can be particularly effective for relieving swelling and inflammation after a trauma, while also strengthening your immune system to promote overall better health.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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