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Alternative Speech Therapy For Children With Speech and Language Disorders

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Alternative Speech Therapy For Children With Speech and Language Disorders

Children or adults with speech or language disorders such as autism, cerebral palsy or developmental delay may require alternative speech therapy methods to express their needs, wants and ideas. This could include pointing at pictures, writing down words on paper or using voice output devices like communication boards or “talkers” that use touch-sensitive buttons for speaking.

According to each patient’s individual needs, an AAC team composed of a speech-language pathologist and assistive technology specialists can determine which tools are most beneficial. These systems may range from low tech options such as dry erase boards or picture-based communication books, to high tech like tablets and speech-generating devices.

The team offers personalized equipment fitting and training, helping patients maintain their new AAC tools throughout their lifetime. Members of this team are certified through The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Assistive Technology Center and Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America.

Children with speech disorders who are unable to speak at all may benefit from AAC therapies, which teach the child various alternatives for speaking such as signs, symbols or gestures. It is essential for parents to remember that AAC therapy is not a magic solution to speech and language issues but an aid that may help their child express their ideas more effectively.

Any child with a speech or language disorder can benefit from AAC, which can come in many forms from simple systems to high-tech devices. No matter the level of intervention, AAC offers your child many advantages – such as increased independence and involvement in activities, as well as decreased frustration levels.

Another type of therapy that may be beneficial for speech patients is neurofeedback, a biofeedback method that uses sensors to monitor brainwave activity. This teaches the individual how to control their own patterns of brainwave activity and extend time spent in an “ideal” state.

This technique can be especially beneficial to children with dysarthria, stuttering, apraxia and other speech-related disorders. Additionally, it helps them improve their coordination, executive functioning and social skills.

Complementary therapies can be an excellent way to supplement speech therapy and help you and your family feel more at home in the world of language therapy. Whether it’s yoga, drama or another creative form of therapy that adds fun and creativity into sessions, these activities could make a great addition to your child’s program for speech therapy.

Other complementary therapies to speech therapy that may be considered complementary include massage, otolaryngology and chiropractic services. Although research is limited, preliminary evidence suggests that cranio-sacral and myofascial massage could aid infants with feeding difficulties due to delayed articulation or oral motor delays.

These therapies can aid your child in improving their overall wellbeing, relieving stress and anxiety, as well as encouraging relaxation and mindfulness. They may be recommended in addition to traditional speech-language therapy for those suffering from stuttering, articulation or voice disorders.

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