fbpx

An Alternative Therapy HIV Study Finds a New Way to Attack the Herpes Virus

- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:

An Alternative Therapy HIV Study Finds a New Way to Attack the Herpes Virus

Research into an alternative therapy for herpes virus (hsv) has identified a way to combat the virus that may help prevent outbreaks and reduce pain. It does this by mimicking a key enzyme in the body which shuts down cell death pathways.

Researchers discovered that the drug worked by inhibiting CREB3 gene, an essential gene for cell survival. Additionally, it prevented viruses from binding to cytokines which trigger cell death and inflammation, according to Lund University press release. These findings could provide a “one-two punch” that would stop active infections while decreasing or eliminating future risks, according to researchers.

Herpes simplex types 1 and 2 are viruses that cause infection and inflammation of the skin, mouth, and genital areas. These illnesses can affect people of all ages–children as well as elderly individuals–but are especially prevalent among those whose immune systems have been compromised due to HIV infection or organ transplants.

Treatment of herpes infection usually begins with oral acyclovir (400-500 mg twice daily) for those with healthy immune systems and intravenous acyclovir therapy for immunocompromised individuals or those who experience frequent or severe recurrences. Oral acyclovir has been proven safe and effective for both herpes simplex type 1 and 2 infections, and may be combined with other antivirals when necessary.

Acyclovir is an antigenically active agent that targets the herpes virus and inhibits viral production, leading to rapid decreases in outbreaks. It comes in both tablets and capsules, but most often taken orally.

In addition to decreasing recurrences, suppression therapy can also alleviate pain and improve quality of life for many patients with recurrent herpes. Unfortunately, suppressive therapy is less successful at preventing transmission of genital herpes to sexual partners than using antivirals during an episode.

Herpes labialis recurrences can be excruciatingly painful and disrupt daily activities and intimacy. Furthermore, it may lead to embarrassment or stress; thus, treating recurrent herpes labialis promptly is key for alleviating its effects.

A randomized trial revealed that oral acyclovir and simulated PDT are safe and effective at preventing herpes labialis recurrences. In this trial, 180 patients with recurrent herpes labialis were enrolled to receive treatment and evaluation.

Results from this trial indicated that both acyclovir and simulated PDT significantly reduced the number of lesions, vesicles, ulcers, and crusts. Furthermore, acyclovir significantly shortened both time to recurrence and duration of symptoms.

Furthermore, acyclovir significantly improved symptoms and quality of life for some patients with herpes labialis. Furthermore, it had an effective impact on reducing recurrence rates among milder cases of the infection.

Many patients with recurrent herpes labialis find acyclovir to be the most effective and cost-effective approach for controlling their condition. It is essential that patients assess whether they would like to continue taking this suppressive therapy on an annual basis.

Sign up here to try or learn about sound therapy that lowers anxiety, insomnia, pain, insomnia, and tinnitus an average of 77%.


- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
SoundTherapy.com