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Dealing With Catastrophizing Anxiety

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Dealing With Catastrophizing Anxiety

Catastrophizing is a form of mental illness that comes with high anxiety. This form of anxiety is associated with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The symptoms of catastrophizing include heightened anxiety, worry, pessimism, and negative thoughts. These symptoms are often related to a traumatic event. It is a common problem for anxious people.

Symptoms can worsen over time. However, there are ways to deal with catastrophizing. One way is to work with your own coping strategies. You can also work with a therapist. A therapist can help you identify and replace illogical thoughts with more sensible ones.

Another coping strategy is to sit with your emotions. Sitting with your emotions can pacify your fear and worry. If your mind starts to get agitated, you can try to stop yourself by breathing deeply.

In addition, you can use cognitive behavioral therapy to train yourself to assess your experiences in a realistic way. By training your brain to think realistically, you can break the cycle of catastrophic thinking.

Catastrophizing can be dangerous if not dealt with in the right way. For instance, it can lead to depression, PTSD, and panic disorder.

Although there is no concrete definition of catastrophizing, researchers have identified a number of hallmarks of this psychological condition. Specifically, people who catastrophize usually have increased perceptions of harm. They tend to overly focus on the worst-case scenario.

Catastrophizing can be triggered by a variety of situations. It is more common in young adults, teenagers, and children. However, it can affect anyone at any age.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:

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