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Do You Target Voiced Or Voiceless Sounds First in Therapy?

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Do You Target Voiced Or Voiceless Sounds First in Therapy?

Clinical and scientific debates often center around the priority of voiced or voiceless sounds in therapy. To truly answer this question, it is necessary to take into account how individual treatment targets may be modified by specific ingredients.

A common strategy for selecting target sound selection is to consider the earliest-developing sounds in each child’s speech and language development sequence. Many pediatric speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other therapists report adopting this strategy in their practice, especially for those early sounds parents or caregivers have identified as most important for the child to learn in order to communicate effectively (e.g., /d/, /b/, /p/, and /m/).

According to the developmental order of acquisition strategy, we can focus on sounds that are of high value to a child or parent such as their own name, that of a sibling, school, favorite toy – this approach is commonly referred to as either “client-specific” or “nondevelopmental.”

However, the RTSS categorizes treatment targets into three orthogonal groups: Organ Functions, Skills and Habits, and Representations. This allows clinicians and researchers to group ingredients into unique treatment theory categories that are operationalized with specific ways in which each ingredient may vary depending on the target.

One example is the chance to practice vocalization with a specific pitch or loudness level (ingredient category). This ingredient could vary between patients depending on their target.

Similar to how a single pharmaceutical ingredient can be administered in various amounts to affect different targets (e.g., more or less milligrams of aspirin for pain reduction).

In some cases, this approach may serve as a useful guide when selecting specific ingredients. Not only are there opportunities for practicing voice quality and delivery vehicle for practicing this behavior, but some ingredient categories also contain the desired dose of an ingredient during a specific duration or pitch.

Another example is the chance for children to practice switching between their disordered voice and normal one during an activity like the Rainbow Passage. Not only would this strategy benefit their own voice, but it’s essential for them to learn how to switch between these voices during everyday situations such as at work or school.

We recognize that this task necessitates an exceptional level of control, so we developed “controlled switchback” as a solution. Through this method, patients learn how to quickly and precisely switch between their disordered voice and new normal voice during automatic speech activities.

For this target, we have organized ingredients and targets into 19 distinct target and ingredient categories based on RTSS-Voice rules and terminology. These categories reflect differences in how each target is affected by different ingredients or delivered to an individual target. These consensus labels and operationalized components make up RTSS-Voice, which can help clinicians and researchers more accurately identify and deliver effective voice therapy treatments.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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