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How EMDR Therapy Works

- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:

How EMDR Therapy Works

EMDR therapy is a trauma treatment that uses eye movements along with an organized process to help you reprocess distressing memories. Additionally, it can transform negative thoughts that clutter up your mind and boost your self-esteem.

At the start of EMDR therapy, your therapist will take a comprehensive history and assess you for any mental health issues that could interfere with its effectiveness. They’ll also identify which memories to focus on during treatment, as well as discuss triggers and desired outcomes.

At this crucial stage of treatment, your therapist will assess how you’re progressing and whether additional targeted memories need to be addressed. If so, they may administer a “body scan” to detect any symptoms experienced when thinking about or experiencing that memory.

While working through memory, you’ll be asked to consider developing a positive belief. You have the freedom to build this new belief on your own or with the therapist’s assistance.

In this phase, you’ll practice performing eye movements that activate both sides of your brain. These back-and-forth motions may induce physiological changes similar to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, helping the brain process memories more quickly and allowing you to regulate emotions better.

At this stage, your therapist will ask you to focus on a particular memory and use eye movements while thinking about it. They may also apply bilateral stimulation such as rhythmic tapping or audio tones directed to both ears. Your therapist will keep this going until the memory no longer causes any negative feelings or sensations.

Sign up here to try or learn about sound therapy that lowers anxiety, insomnia, pain, insomnia, and tinnitus an average of 77%.


- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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