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How to Teach Er Sound to Students With /R/

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How to Teach Er Sound to Students With /R/

Speech therapy students with /r/ can be particularly challenging to work on. This sound can be challenging to teach both in isolation and carryover context. Fortunately, there are several effective strategies for teaching /r/ sounds in both academic settings and speech therapy sessions.

To effectively teach /r/, it is essential to first identify which contexts your students can make this sound in. Doing so will enable you to plan effective articulation activities for them and identify which words they can and cannot produce /r/ in.

You can use a probe to collect this information and use it to plan er sound activities in the classroom or therapy room. These probes should include multiple word positions and contexts of /r/ (initial, medial, final and blends) as well as vocalic /r/.

Mirroring the student’s tongue as it moves up and down in front of their mouth can help them visualize its movement, producing the /r/ sound. You might ask them to draw or glue their tongue onto paper or glue it into a model so they can visualize how each part of their body works together to produce speech sounds.

Another way to help students practice /r/ is by having them imitate different words with and without an /r/, such as “pen”. You could then ask them which word contains more /r/ and ask them which word doesn’t, like a “sun”.

To effectively teach /r/ in the classroom, make sure your probe includes words starting with this sound! Asking students to select two words that begin with this letter will give you insight into their production abilities and provide you with information regarding where they may or may not make the sound during instruction.

Once you’ve identified which contexts your students can and cannot produce /r/, it’s time to practice it independently. For instance, ask them to say a word that begins with this sound (such as “pen”), then imitate by saying another word starting with /r/, such as “sun”.

If your student does not produce the sound correctly during an isolation session, repeat the activity in class or at home so they can practice and get some feedback on their production. Utilizing these strategies will help your students master producing /r/ and develop the necessary skills to carry it over into everyday speech.

Articulation games are an excellent way to elicit target sounds while having fun and engaging your students. Furthermore, they serve to reinforce new speech therapy concepts.

These articulation games are especially helpful for students who may struggle to follow instructions clearly. This activity will get them focused on their speech and help them become more efficient with both speaking and listening.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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