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Migraine Targeted Therapy

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Migraine Targeted Therapy

Migraines are a serious medical condition that affects more than 37 million people worldwide, often chronic and debilitating to both the patient and those around them. Common symptoms of migraines include throbbing head pain, nausea and vomiting, light or sound sensitivity problems as well as other problems interfering with daily activities.

Recent advances in migraine research have led to the development of drugs that target certain pathways. These medicines can be used both to prevent migraines for some patients and treat their symptoms when someone experiences them.

The CGRP receptor is an essential neuropeptide involved in migraine pathophysiology, and many medications to block its activity (gepants). While some evidence has been provided for their efficacy against acute migraine attacks in both children and adults alike, gepants do have side effects to contend with.

Alternatively, the CGRP receptor can be targeted with a monoclonal antibody which binds to and disables its function. Several monoclonal antibodies against CGRP have been approved in the US for prophylactic use in migraine patients; these include erenumab (Amgen and Novartis), fremanezumab (Teva), galcanezumab (Eli Lilly) and eptinezumab (Lundbeck).

Anti-CGRP antibodies are generally safe and well tolerated. With a half life of three months, they can be administered less frequently than traditional migraine medicines that must be taken daily.

Monoclonal antibodies targeting the PACAP pathway have also been developed for migraine therapy. These mAbs bind to PACAP38 and PACAP27 receptors, which have been implicated in migraine pathophysiology.

Clinical trials are currently being conducted on several mAbs, such as ALD1910 which binds to PACAP38 and PACAP27 and has been approved in Europe for migraine prevention; and AMG301 which targets PAC1 receptors and is in phase II trials. Unfortunately, the results of these trials have yet to be released.

There are still a number of potential therapeutic targets for migraine that require further investigation and clinical trials to assess their efficacy and safety. Some are based on the discovery of new peptides, while others come from novel targets. These discoveries may provide us with better insights into migraine’s mechanisms as well as help develop more effective therapies.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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