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Migraines and Hormones – How Hormone Replacement Therapy Can Help

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Migraines and Hormones – How Hormone Replacement Therapy Can Help

Many women experience hormone changes during perimenopause and menopause that exacerbate their migraines. On the other hand, some may find relief through hormone replacement therapy.

Women experience more migraines than men due to hormonal changes throughout their lives, such as menarche, pregnancy, contraceptive use, and the years leading up to menopause when estrogen levels drastically decrease.

Menstrual migraine is a type of migraine caused by changes in sex hormones that typically occurs on day 1 +/- 2 of your cycle and usually doesn’t have an aura. It may cause sharp, persistent pain on one side of the head which may lead to nausea or vomiting.

Menstrual migraine can be treated by your doctor with NSAIDs (Advil and Motrin), aspirin, and triptans. However, if these medications aren’t providing relief, your physician may suggest other drugs like calcium channel blockers or antidepressants as a possible alternative.

Women who experience regular cycles can benefit from cyclical menstrual headache therapy, which includes both cyclical and continuous mixed hormonal therapy. Studies have demonstrated that this combination of treatments reduces migraine incidence in both perimenopausal and menopausal women.

In addition to using cyclical menstrual headache therapy, you might also try to prevent migraines by changing your diet and sleep patterns and avoiding foods known to trigger migraines. Additionally, keeping a headache journal is essential; this helps both you and your doctor identify underlying factors that could be causing or exacerbating symptoms.

Another treatment option is switching from traditional estrogen-progestin combination birth control pills to natural hormone replacement therapy, such as bioidentical oestrogen and progesterone. This type of remedy may be especially helpful for women who have experienced an abrupt increase in migraines during menopause and are seeking relief.

However, this type of treatment may not be ideal for everyone. Some women have reported that a longer-term hormone replacement program hasn’t had the same positive impact on their migraines as a shorter-term, lower dose plan.

The good news is that more and more practitioners are beginning to recognize HRT as a viable treatment for migraines, not just a masking agent. Indeed, research presented at last year’s American Headache Society annual meeting revealed that women with a history of migraine who took bioidentical hormone therapy were less likely to experience cardiovascular disease events than those without such treatment.

Hormone-related migraines can be treated by a number of methods, such as taking an NSAID or triptan, changing your diet and lifestyle, or trying relaxation techniques like massage or meditation. Furthermore, some doctors suggest biofeedback therapy or acupuncture for their potential to make you more aware of yourself physically and mentally while teaching you how to voluntarily control certain bodily responses.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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