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Pet Music Therapy Can Have a Calming Effect on Our Pets

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Pet Music Therapy Can Have a Calming Effect on Our Pets

Pet music therapy has a calming effect on our pets, and many veterinarians use it to help their patients relax. It may also be beneficial for animals recovering from surgery or experiencing chronic pain.

Cats and dogs are highly tuned to sound, and can respond well to musical compositions that closely replicate natural sounds. This is especially true when the frequency of the music matches their hearing range and if its pitch and tempo are just right.

Animal shelters have long understood that soothing classical music can reduce stress in their animals. It also helps them settle down during visits to kennels or waiting rooms before seeing their veterinarian.

According to one study, dogs listening to classical music had their breathing slowed and were less likely to pace or remain standing. By comparison, heavy metal music agitated them and made them more active.

These studies sought to gain a better understanding of how music affects our pets’ health and welfare, particularly when they experience stress. The types of music which have beneficial results depend on both the species’ ethology as well as the individual’s personality traits and learning history.

Researchers studied the effects of various music genres on dog behavior over five days. Acoustic stimuli were presented between 10:00 and 16:30, with three behavioral parameters – position, location and vocalization – being recorded at each 1.5 hour period. On days 1-4 and 11, dogs received a different music treatment each day.

At the conclusion of each 1.5 hour session, owners and clinicians completed a standardized survey. Urinary cortisol levels were also collected at each endpoint.

Dogs exposed to the same music treatment every day showed less time pacing and standing when it played. Furthermore, they had fewer instances of barking and showed altered heart rate variability, possibly indicative of reduced stress levels.

Research by the University of California at Berkeley revealed that dogs exposed to classical music had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Furthermore, they experienced fewer instances of separation anxiety when the music was played.

Researchers suggest it may be beneficial to incorporate a variety of musical genres and play the music at low volume for short bursts of time. Doing this helps prevent habituation and ensures more consistent results.

Start by creating a playlist featuring songs your pet is likely to enjoy. Doing this helps them associate the music with you and makes it simpler for them to listen without much fuss or disruption.

Another solution is to compose a piece of music with specific qualities that calm your animal. This could include longer notes, an even rhythm and a slow tempo.

If you’re uncertain which music type best suits your pet, try playing an instrumental piece that combines various instruments like piano, flute or harp. These melodic compositions can be very calming for your animal companion and have a lasting impression.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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