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Stranger Anxiety in Infants and Toddlers

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Stranger Anxiety in Infants and Toddlers

Stranger anxiety is a normal emotion experienced when children experience fear or distress around a new person. It typically begins around 8 months of age and usually subsides by two years old.

When a stranger enters their home, babies may cry or fuss. They may also try to hide their face or cling onto their parent for support.

Stranger anxiety can last for a variety of reasons, but it’s more common among babies between 6 months and 3 years old. If the fear or discomfort persists for an extended period or affects a child’s social development, medical assistance should be sought immediately.

Children whose parents experience anxiety may have an increased tendency to develop anxiety disorders, including stranger fear. Furthermore, a child’s social environment and parenting techniques may contribute to developing this phobia as well.

We investigated whether the trajectory of stranger fear across infancy and toddlerhood was heritable. We analyzed a large, longitudinal data set containing parent-reported and observed stranger fear measures for 1285 infants and toddlers, finding that high/steady stranger fear trajectory was heritable with twin concordance rates (kh2(3) = 2.28; p>.10) for DZ cotwins and MZ cotwins respectively; however, baseline RSA was not heritable when class membership was taken into account.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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