fbpx

Teaching Complementary and Alternative Therapies – A New Frontier for Nursing Education?

- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:

Teaching Complementary and Alternative Therapies – A New Frontier for Nursing Education?

As more and more people turn to alternative and complementary healthcare practices for a healthier lifestyle, nursing has an opportunity to be at the forefront of promoting these non-traditional approaches. Nurses must educate students about these therapies as well as give them the skills needed to provide them safely in both clinical settings and classroom settings.

Nurses who integrate complementary treatments into their practice have an opportunity to demonstrate how their holistic and caring philosophy of care is reflected in the use of these practices. Patients often appreciate when a health professional or therapist takes time to listen and address their worries. Furthermore, patients may be less likely to report adverse effects from complementary therapies if they have received education about them and spoken with others who have used them previously.

Educating nurses about these alternatives to traditional healthcare necessitates an awareness of their place within the system and a desire to explore their role within nursing. Furthermore, educators must take into account the value of scientific research and its effect on nursing education.

The boundaries of complementary and alternative therapies are constantly shifting. According to a 2012 study published by NCCAM, more than 30% of adults were now using approaches to health care that did not originate within the Western biomedical model or had roots outside Western culture.

These include mind-body interventions, energy therapies and manipulative/body-based methods as well as biologically based practices and products for healing. NCCAM defines CAM this way: “Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) encompasses comprehensive systems of theory and practice developed outside the Western biomedical model that combine natural and biologically based approaches to health.”

Nursing educators may be reluctant to introduce CAT as a teaching technique due to concerns that it won’t be accepted by all, but studies have demonstrated its efficacy for various health conditions. They’re especially useful when treating chronic or multi-system diseases like cancer or heart disease that involve multiple organ systems.

Teachers must take an empathic approach when introducing Cognitive Analysis Techniques (CATs) into their curriculums. Specifically, they need to create an environment that promotes learning about this new way of thinking and be willing to examine their own prejudices and preconceived beliefs.

As with any educational endeavor, the assumptions and objectives for introducing complementary therapies into nursing curricula must be clearly defined and rigorously assessed to guarantee they are being achieved. Furthermore, CAT research is an intricate area that demands experienced faculty who possess expertise in this area for teaching purposes.

Current levels of computer assisted transcription in nursing education are lacking, as most schools lack a dedicated course or program on the topic and many students lack exposure to it at all. Therefore, it is imperative to enhance existing programs and create new ones by designing curriculums with both problem-based and case based components that will foster mastery over CAT skills and its application holistically in nursing practice.

Sign up here to try or learn about sound therapy that lowers anxiety, insomnia, pain, insomnia, and tinnitus an average of 77%.


- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
SoundTherapy.com