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The Order of Sounds in Speech Therapy

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The Order of Sounds in Speech Therapy

The order of sounds in speech therapy is vitally important as it determines how your child learns to produce each sound correctly. Lip sounds (such as /p/, /b/ and /t/) usually emerge early on since they are easier for kids to imitate; back of mouth noises like /k/ and /g/ are harder to visualize and thus usually last to be worked on.

The therapist will select a target sound and teach it to your child using an age-appropriate technique. At this stage, they work on refining the pronunciation by identifying syllables that contain the correct sound, then producing them using appropriate articulator placement (lips, tongue, velum, teeth).

Once your child can produce the sound in syllables accurately, it is time to move onto real words. The therapist will practice the sound at the start, middle and end of a word using pictures as cues; this helps them comprehend what needs to be done and provides useful feedback.

At this stage, you can help your child by practicing the correct sound at home with them. Create sentences containing that sound and say them aloud; alternatively, try saying it yourself using therapist cue cards. It’s beneficial to practice various words at this stage so you can observe how well-progressed your child is and any difficulties they might be having.

Your therapist may suggest practicing target sounds at the start, middle, or end of a word depending on which ones your child needs most practice with; this will vary from child to child.

If your child has difficulty pronouncing a word, ask them to repeat it back to you so they can hear any errors in pronunciation. Then reward them when the correct sound comes out correctly; this will build confidence and an understanding of different sounds in words.

Another way you can help your child is by encouraging them to recite their favorite nursery rhymes and songs aloud. Doing so will enable them to recognize the correct sound in each word, leading to correct production of it.

Finally, one way you can help your child is by encouraging them to speak to a friend, family member or therapist. Doing this will improve their awareness of their speech sounds and promote its use in everyday communication.

Once your child can recite their favorite nursery rhymes or songs, it is a great opportunity for them to practice pronouncing words correctly and receive helpful feedback. They can use this knowledge when conversing with friends and family members.

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- Welcome, SoundTherapy.com lowers anxiety 86%, pain 77%, and boosts memory 11-29%. Click on the brain to sign up or share with buttons below to help others:
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