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The Oxford Handbook of Music Therapy Edited by Jane Edwards

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The Oxford Handbook of Music Therapy Edited by Jane Edwards

Music therapy has blossomed into one of the premier evidence-based psychosocial allied health professions to meet needs across ages and stages. This book serves as a key reference, compiling research and theory from internationally renowned experts – making it an invaluable resource for students, professionals, and anyone with an interest in this field.

This book presents the various approaches and techniques in music therapy, as well as how music fits into therapeutic work, through case histories of children, adolescents and adults receiving group or individual therapy. It illustrates how music can be used to build positive relating skills and give clients tools for dealing with life’s obstacles.

The Oxford Handbook of Music Therapy edited by Jane Edwards is an invaluable resource for both students and practitioners. It provides comprehensive coverage of the model and approaches in music therapy, along with detailed case studies, plus a current look at trends within this profession. As such, this practical guide can be used as either a textbook for students or just an introduction into this profession.

Musical therapy aims to assist individuals in overcoming physical and emotional struggles through music, combined with the therapist’s expertise. The main focus is on the individual, so therapists must tailor their sessions according to each client’s specific requirements.

Music therapists have many methods and instruments at their disposal to aid clients in their healing process. For instance, they could use a hand drum or small guitar to play rhythms and build connections between them and the client without using an overt melody.

Another method of musical therapy is neurologic music therapy (NMT), which focuses on the brain’s response to music. NMT claims this type of treatment can alter how someone’s brain works and even stimulate new neuron growth within it.

Other instruments useful in music therapy include the djembe or hand drum, which is an excellent percussion instrument with no central melodic component that can be played even by those with little to no musical background. A mini guitar also makes a good choice as it’s portable and easy to learn how to play.

Music therapists must be knowledgeable about their chosen instruments, and make sure they are safe for clients with certain medical conditions. Music therapy has proven to be highly beneficial to those suffering from autism, dementia, mental health issues and other medical ailments.

Music therapists must consider their personal preferences when selecting an instrument for a client, as this can affect the treatment they provide. Some prefer guitar or piano, while others find drums to be more beneficial for certain patients.

Music therapists may incorporate other methods into their practice, such as massage, acupuncture and yoga. These therapies have been scientifically proven to aid with healing processes and are frequently included in a client’s overall treatment plan, enabling the therapist to address multiple aspects of their patient’s lives simultaneously for a more holistic approach that may prove more successful for clients.

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